Gone Sea Anglin´…

…and do something other than having my head in dusty papers about Shetland’s mining history. The weather was begging me to get out and get some…oxygen. And, it was Midsummer and Father’s Day. Good idea!

Taking out my small collapsible spinning rod, a box of lures commonly used in northern Swedish inland waters and my expectations I stuffed these in my small day-pack (uh…not the expectations) and headed out to an adventure with Jeppe.

As I drove, my only thought was, “but how in the h… does one fish in the briny waters around Shetland…and from shore?” The challenge was well worth the taking.

fshingboat01

    Photo: Fishing in the sea requires a whole different kind of equipment

    I found a nice little rock sticking out along the shores of the “Cliffs of Cunningsburgh”, a place I’ve been before looking for ancient holes in the ground. I took off my pack, took out my collapsible spinning rod, still with last years nylon line for Swedish fishing, and chose a 15 g “Toby” spinner. I figured the beasts in the water would find a shiny copper-colored Toby a great morsel to contend with. Tied a knot strong enough to take on familiar northern pike and threw it anxiously out into the Atlantic.

    After 20 minutes of this, I figured the fish were bored, so I smacked on a 20 g Toby. I worked with this for another 20 mintues, changed to a 28 g Toby (heck, gotta wake those fish up somehow) and another 20 minutes. The next two hours, I was throwing everything bigger than my trout flies out into the depths in front of me…and…nothing happened.

    Everything but fish was interested in what I was doing. I had Arctic Terns hover over the lures, as they wiggled through the water. A diving Puffin got fairly close once, as well as a Razorbill and a couple of Common Gulls. Then, just as I had thrown out a “day-glow” spinner, used for graylings, a gray seal popped its head up outa the water a little out from where the spinner landed.

    I thought, crap! I don’t wanna hook a seal or a Puffin! Besides, what would I do if I caught a fish that was so strange and ugly, I wouldn’t even know if it was edible? Or, maybe a Killer Whale was nearby doing his own kind of “fishing”? Or….

    So, I quit! What did I learn? Fishing in the sea is entirely different to fishing in freshwater . The two jist don’t mix! The only thing I got today was fresh-air, some sun and lots of relaxation, which is mostly why people go “sea-angling” anyways. Right?

    PS- Shetland is supposed to have great freshwater fishing; brown trout and some Arctic char. See following: Shetland Trout Fishing

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *